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Standard

Welding, Brazing, and Soldering - Materials and Practices

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J1147_201801
The Joint AWS/SAE Committee on Automotive Welding was organized on January 16, 1974, for the primary purpose of facilitating the development and publication of various documents related to the selection, specification, testing, and use of welding materials and practices, particularly for the automotive and related industries. A secondary purpose is the dissemination of technical information.
Standard

Welding, Brazing, and Soldering-Materials and Practices

1976-07-01
HISTORICAL
J1147_197607
The Joint AWS/SAE Committee on Automotive Welding was organized on January 16, 1974, for the primary purpose of facilitating the development and publication of various documents related to the selection, specification, testing, and use of welding materials and practices, particularly for the automotive and related industries. A secondary purpose is the dissemination of technical information.
Standard

Solders

2017-11-17
WIP
J473
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application.
Standard

Sintered Powder Metal Parts: Ferrous

1966-06-01
HISTORICAL
J471_196606
Powder metal (P/M) parts are manufactured by pressing metal powders to the required shape in a precision die and sintering to produce metallurgical bonds between the particles, thus generating the appropriate mechanical properties. The shape and mechanical properties of the part may be subsequently modified by repressing or by conventional methods such as machining and/or heat treating. While powder metallurgy embraces a number of fields wherein metal powders may be used as raw materials, this standard is concerned primarily with information relating to mechanical components and bearings produced from iron-base materials.
Standard

SINTERED POWDER METAL PARTS: FERROUS

1973-08-01
CURRENT
J471_197308
Powder metal (P/M) parts are manufactured by pressing metal powders to the required shape in a precision die and sintering to produce metallurgical bonds between the particles, thus generating the appropriate mechanical properties. The shape and mechanical properties of the part may be subsequently modified by repressing or by conventional methods such. as machining and/or heat treating. While powder metallurgy embraces a number of fields wherein metal powders may be used as raw materials, this standard is concerned primarily with information relating to mechanical components and bearings produced from iron-base materials.
Standard

Solders

1962-06-01
HISTORICAL
J473A_196206
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application.
Standard

11/17/17Sintered Powder Metal Parts: Ferrous

2017-11-17
WIP
J471
Powder metal (P/M) parts are manufactured by pressing metal powders to the required shape in a precision die and sintering to produce metallurgical bonds between the particles, thus generating the appropriate mechanical properties. The shape and mechanical properties of the part may be subsequently modified by repressing or by conventional methods such as machining and/or heat treating. While powder metallurgy embraces a number of fields wherein metal powders may be used as raw materials, this standard is concerned primarily with information relating to mechanical components and bearings produced from iron-base materials.
Standard

ABRASIVE WEAR

1966-08-01
HISTORICAL
J965_196608
An enormous economic loss, as well as a waste of natural resources, is incurred world-wide as a result of wear of components and tools. Any effort expended in an attempt to reduce this loss is indeed worthwhile. The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to present the current state of knowledge of abrasive wear. This report, therefore, covers wear, or the undesired removal of metal by mechanical action, caused by abrasive particles in contact with the surface. It does not concern metal-to-metal wear or wear in the presence of an abrasive free lubricant. Abrasive wear occurs when hard particles, such as rocks, sand, or fragments of certain hard metals, slide or roll under pressure across a surface. This action tends to cut grooves across the metal surface, much like a cutting tool. Abrasive wear is of considerable importance in any part moving in relation to an abrasive.
Standard

Abrasive Wear

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J965_201801
An enormous economic loss, as well as a waste of natural resources, is incurred world-wide as a result of wear of components and tools. Any effort expended in an attempt to reduce this loss is indeed worthwhile. The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to present the current state of knowledge of abrasive wear. This report, therefore, covers wear, or the undesired removal of metal by mechanical action, caused by abrasive particles in contact with the surface. It does not concern metal-to-metal wear or wear in the presence of an abrasive free lubricant. Abrasive wear occurs when hard particles, such as rocks, sand, or fragments of certain hard metals, slide or roll under pressure across a surface. This action tends to cut grooves across the metal surface, much like a cutting tool. Abrasive wear is of considerable importance in any part moving in relation to an abrasive.
Standard

SOLDERS

1962-06-01
CURRENT
J473_196206
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose will depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application. All the lead-tin solders, with or without antimony, are usually suitable for joining steel and copper base alloys. For galvanized steel or zinc, only Class A solders should be used. Class B solders, containing antimony usually as a substitute for some of the tin or to increase strength and hardness of the filler metal, form intermetallic antimony-zinc compounds, causing the joint to become embrittled. Lead-tin solders are not recommended for joining aluminum, magnesium, or stainless steel.
Standard

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF CAST IRONS

1988-05-01
HISTORICAL
J125_198805
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide automotive engineers and designers with a concise statement of the basic characteristics of cast iron under elevated temperature conditions. As such, the report concentrates on general statements regarding these properties with limited illustrative data, anticipating that those who may be interested in more detail will want to use the bibliography provided at the conclusion of the report.
Standard

Elevated Temperature Properties of Cast Irons

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J125_201801
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide automotive engineers and designers with a concise statement of the basic characteristics of cast iron under elevated temperature conditions. As such, the report concentrates on general statements regarding these properties with limited illustrative data, anticipating that those who may be interested in more detail will want to use the bibliography provided at the conclusion of the report.
Standard

Marine Control Cable Connection-Engine Clutch Lever

1991-06-01
HISTORICAL
J960_199106
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide guides toward standard conditions for operating marine hydraulic transmissions where push-pull cable control is applicable. For control cable information see SAE J917.
Standard

Marine Control Cable Connection--Engine Clutch Lever

2001-02-14
HISTORICAL
J960_200102
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide guides toward standard conditions for operating marine hydraulic transmissions where push-pull cable control is applicable. For control cable information see SAE J917. a. Provide suitable detents at forward, neutral, and reverse positions. Approximately 22 N (5 lb) of cable force are required to move the engine clutch lever out of the detent positions. b. Provide an engine clutch lever with a 6.35 mm (1/4 in) diameter hole at a radius to provide 70 mm (2 3/4 in) linear travel from forward to reverse, with neutral at the center. c. The engine clutch lever (at 6.35 mm [1/4 in] diameter hole) to have 6.35 mm (1/4 in) maximum thickness. Common cable terminals used are ball joints, clevises, and pivots. d. Provide clear cable path to engine clutch lever. e. Provide choice of cable paths from different angles. This can be done by providing a sector type of lever with a series of holes equidistant from the centerline of the shaft.
Standard

Marine Control Cable Connection--Engine Clutch Lever

2008-04-14
HISTORICAL
J960_200804
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide guides toward standard conditions for operating marine hydraulic transmissions where push-pull cable control is applicable. For control cable information see SAE J917. a. Provide suitable detents at forward, neutral, and reverse positions. Approximately 22 N (5 lb) of cable force are required to move the engine clutch lever out of the detent positions. b. Provide an engine clutch lever with a 6.35 mm (1/4 in) diameter hole at a radius to provide 70 mm (2 3/4 in) linear travel from forward to reverse, with neutral at the center. c. The engine clutch lever (at 6.35 mm [1/4 in] diameter hole) to have 6.35 mm (1/4 in) maximum thickness. Common cable terminals used are ball joints, clevises, and pivots. d. Provide clear cable path to engine clutch lever. e. Provide choice of cable paths from different angles. This can be done by providing a sector type of lever with a series of holes equidistant from the centerline of the shaft.
Standard

Marine Control Cable Connection - Engine Clutch Lever

2018-02-24
CURRENT
J960_201802
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide guides toward standard conditions for operating marine hydraulic transmissions where push-pull cable control is applicable. For control cable information see SAE J917.
Standard

Marine Control Cable Connection - Engine Clutch Lever

2012-08-20
HISTORICAL
J960_201208
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide guides toward standard conditions for operating marine hydraulic transmissions where push-pull cable control is applicable. For control cable information see SAE J917.
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